Theosophical Encyclopedia

Aura

TE 2 Aura 220

The term “aura” is often used to describe the flow of energy from an object or living thing. Subtle bodies or vehicles comprising any living thing may extend their influence beyond the limit of the physical form and be seen by clairvoyants. Clairvoyants claim to see up to five of these around a human form. Of these the so-called “health-aura” is said to be the most dense. In some cases this is probably PRANA, or life-energy. Some clairvoyants claim to be able to determine the emotional and health condition of a person by the appearance of their aura.

Read more: Aura

Immortality

TE d Immortality

From earliest times the belief in the immortality of the “soul” has been widespread, both among primitive societies and the more sophisticated. This issue can be found debated in the Katha UPANISAD, “This doubt that arises, consequent on the death of a man — some saying, ‘It exists,’ and others saying, ‘It does not exist’ — I would know this, under your instruction.” (I.i. 20) PLATO took the view that since the soul exists, its nature must be indestructible and therefore immortality is a fact in Nature.

Read more: Immortality

The Objects of The Theosophical Society

TE b Theosophical Society x

 

The objects of the Theosophical Society (TS) underwent several revisions since its founding. At a meeting of the newly formed society in New York, October 30, 1875, the following statement was made:

The title of the Theosophical Society explains the objects and desires of its founders: they “seek to obtain knowledge of the nature and attributes of the Supreme Power, and of the higher spirits by the aid of physical processes.” In other words they hope, by going deeper than modern science has hitherto done, into the esoteric philosophies of ancient times they may be enabled to obtain for themselves and other investigators, proof of the existence of an “Unseen Universe,” the nature of its inhabitants if such there be, and the laws which govern them and their relations with mankind. Whatever may be the private opinions of its members, the society has no dogma to enforce, no creed to disseminate. It is formed neither as a Spiritualistic schism, nor to serve as the foe or friend of any sectarian or philosophic body. Its only axiom is the omnipotence of truth, its only creed a profession of unqualified devotion to its discovery and propaganda. In considering the qualifications of applicants for membership, it knows neither race, sex, color, country nor creed. (J. Ransom, Short History of the TS)

Read more: The Objects of The Theosophical Society

Historical Photos from the Surendra Narayan Archives (Adyar Archives) – Radha Burnier

RSB 2 a 120

Radha Burnier (née Radha Sri Ram) (November 15, 1923 – October 31, 2013) was the seventh international president of the Theosophical Society (Adyar). Having taken office in 1980, she was the longest standing president of the organization (33 years).

Early life and education

Radha S. Burnier, respectfully called "Radhaji", was born in Adyar, Chennai, India, on the grounds of the Theosophical Society (Adyar) on November 15 , 1923, into a Theosophical family. She was the daughter of Mr. Nilakanta Sri Ram, who was the fifth international president of the organization, and Srimati Bhagirathi, who was also an active member of the Society. Although she was born a Brahmin, her family did not follow the exclusivist customs attached to their caste but adhered to the Theosophical ideal of universal brotherhood.

Read more: Historical Photos from the Surendra Narayan Archives (Adyar Archives) – Radha Burnier

Who Knew H.P.B. When? – Lydia Paschkoff

John Patrick Deveney – USA

TE TH b

Lydia Paschkoff (Countess Lydia Alexandrovna de Pashkov)

One of the most intriguing keys to unlocking the murky history of H. P. Blavatsky in the years before she appeared in New York in 1873 is provided by those who knew her in the early years and then came forward to vouch for her, as Albert Leighton Rawson did, (1) or condemn her, as Emma Coulomb did. We can learn from both sides. Lydia Paschkoff is one of these witnesses who “knew H.P.B. when” and contributes several threads to the confused tapestry of the early history of H.P. Blavatsky and the Theosophical Society. H.P.B. herself tells us (in Letter 78 to A. P. Sinnett) that Paschkoff was the kind soul who notified her that Agardi Metrovitch had fallen ill near Alexandria, Egypt, poisoned (as H.P.B. suspected) by villainous Catholic monks. (2) He died, as Master Hilarion had predicted, on April 19, 1872 (as H.P.B. believed) (3) —a date which, as we shall see, is almost certainly wrong.

Read more: Who Knew H.P.B. When? – Lydia Paschkoff

Text Size

Paypal Donate Button Image

Subscribe to our newsletter

Email address
Confirm your email address

Who's Online

We have 272 guests and no members online

TS-Adyar website banner 150

EUROPEAN SCHOOL OF THEOSOPHY 2021 Logo

itc-tf-default

Vidya Magazine

TheosophyWikiLogoRightPixels