Theosophy

The Golden Hour: A Turning of the Cycle

Tim Boyd – USA, India

Theosophy TB 121 b

Tim Boyd, while delivering the talk on which this article is based, during the 145th International Convention. At the end of this article a YouTube link is provided for those who would like to watch this talk

I would like to consider something related to the theme of our International Convention, “Cycles of Awareness”, particularly how cycles affect us and how we can interact with them in a proactive and productive way.

Cycles affect us at every level. They are so omnipresent at the personal level that they often go unexamined. In her introduction to The Secret Doctrine, H. P. Blavatsky (HPB) discusses Three Fundamental Propositions. Cycles is the second of them. She points to specific cycles such as day and night, life and death, sleeping and waking, the seasons, as being such a common part of our everyday experience that they indicate to us the presence of a fundamental Law of the universe.

Read more: The Golden Hour: A Turning of the Cycle

Imagining Theosophy for the Future

Catalina Isaza Cantor-Agnihotri – Colombia, India

Theosophy CA 2

The author on the far left, accompanied by daughter Yuna and husband Shikhar

When I first saw the theme, “Imagining Theosophy for the Future”, two things came to mind: the power of the word “imagine” and the meaning of “Theosophy”. Imagining is the act of mentally creating or reproducing using the power of the mind; imagination is one of the most advanced human faculties. So what we are doing here is making a collective effort to create mentally, using the power of thought, an image or picture of the future of Theosophy. This leads me to the second point, the meaning of Theosophy. It actually means divine wisdom (brahmavidya). Therefore, it has an immutable nature, it does not change, but the ways of getting closer to it, of spreading it, can and should change.

Read more: Imagining Theosophy for the Future

Theosophy and Belief

Wesley Amerman—USA

Theosophy 121 WA b thinking

Many Theosophists consider themselves above the blind acceptance of ideas and think that while others may adhere to a belief system, they themselves accept ideas solely on their intrinsic merits. I used to think this about myself, and thought that I was the most objective, open-minded and clear-thinking person I knew. Most definitely I am none of these things -- sad experience has taught me better. While I still see this arrogance implied in the speech and writings of fellow Theosophists, I have come to realize how much of my own world-view is part of an "inherited" package of sorts -- those ideas and ideals that have come to me as part of my theosophical upbringing and education. My conclusion is that many Theosophists' beliefs are as dogmatic as those of any religious fanatic.

Read more: Theosophy and Belief

Life Visible and Invisible

H. P. Blavatsky

Theosophy 121 HPB 6

Every organized thing in this world, visible as well as invisible, has an element appropriate to itself. The fish lives and breathes in the water; the plant consumes carbonic acid, which for animals and men produces death; some beings are fitted for rarefied strata of air, others exist only in the densest.

Read more: Life Visible and Invisible

Everything Is Life

H. P. Blavatsky

Theosophy 121 HPB 4

In stones ...

Everything in the Universe, throughout all its kingdoms, is CONSCIOUS: i.e., endowed with a consciousness of its own kind and  on its  own  plane of  perception.  We men  must remember that because we do not perceive any signs – which we can recognize – of  consciousness, say, in  stones,  we have no right to say that no consciousness exists there.

Read more: Everything Is Life

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