The Society

Mini–interviews First Quarter 2012

Opinions and ideas expressed in the mini-interviews are exclusively of those who are being interviewed. They don’t necessarily represent the ideas and opinions of the compilers of Theosophy Forward.

The responses of the interviewees are not edited for content. Some contributors give short answers to the questions while others touch upon the subject more elaborately.

 


Robert Ellwood

1.    What’s your name, where are you from and how long have you been a member of the TS?

My name is Robert S. Ellwood.  Although originally from the Midwest, I have lived in southern California for over forty years.  I have been a member of the Theosophical Society since 1976.

2.    Are you active in your Lodge/Section and if so, what do you do?

I am active in the Ojai Valley lodge of the T.S.   At various times I have been president both of this lodge and earlier the Los Angeles Lodge, and have served a term as vice president of the T.S. in America.

3.    How did you first learn about Theosophy or come in contact with the Society?

I first learned about the Theosophical Society, although I had heard of it vaguely before, in surveying religious and spiritual movements in the Los Angeles area in the late 1960s. At that time I visited meetings, and gradually my interest deepened until I joined.

4.   What does Theosophy mean to you?

I first felt spiritual kinship with Theosophy because, as a professor of world religions at the time with many questions about religious diversity, I felt the Theosophical understanding of the religions, as each an expression of the Ancient Wisdom presented by a master of the wisdom for a particular time and place, seemed more right to me than that of any other perspective of which I knew. Later I found the idea of world spiritual evolution very meaningful as a counter to often-depressing world news, and still later that the concept of the inner planes was very valuable in understanding myself.

5.  What is your favourite Theosophical book and why?

My favorite Theosophical book is The Masters and the Path by C.W. Leadbeater. When I first read it, as my first full-length Theosophical book, I was struck by its clear, vivid writing and how its dramatic perspective contrasted with the usual sort of academic, philosophical, and religious books. That feeling has remained with me.   

6.  What in your opinion is the biggest challenge the TS Adyar (as an organization) is facing at the moment?

I think the challenge to Adyar (and all other) Theosophy is to update our life, image, and organization to resonate with the 21st century, especially the mindset of young people who increasingly think of themselves as spiritual but not religious. We have an opening here, since Theosophy sees itself in the same way, but often our massive buildings, institutional structures, and emphasis on meetings, lectures and old books give an impression of being no different from what seems outdated in religious institutions as well. We need to separate the message from the structures sufficiently the recover the vitality and immediacy of early Theosophy, by using many media and being as democratic and informal as possible while maintaining the core message about the Ancient Wisdom, spiritual evolution, and the inner planes, under the guidance of the Great Souls.   

7.  Is there anything you would wish for the future of the Theosophical Movement?

The transition alluded to above is what I wish for the future of the Theosophical movement.

 



Tran Thi Kim-Diêu

1.    What’s your name, where are you from, and how long have you been a member of the TS?

My name is Tran Thi Kim-Diêu; Kim-Diêu is the first name. I was born in South Vietnam in a Mahayana Buddhist family. I am now a French citizen. I have been a TS member since 1972.

2.    Are you active in your Lodge/Section; and if so, what do you do?

I worked in Joan of Arc Lodge in Orleans, France, in various functions since 1976, first as librarian then as chairperson, also in HQ in Paris since early 1980s. I am the current President of the TS France and the Chairperson of the European Federation of the TS (EFTS). Functions and responsibilities basically indicate work on different levels. From 1991 till 1999 I was travelling to Eastern European countries, particularly Russia and the Ukraine, to share my understanding of the teachings of Theosophy and to make the TS Adyar known. Since then a core of TS members has developed – in Russia, in the Ukraine, but not only there. Several countries that have been parts of the Communist block have now encountered Theosophy and TS Adyar. The purpose of the EFTS is to promote cooperation between different sections, and its action consists of travels of the Chairperson and Executive members to strengthen the link. Nevertheless, TS work basically concerns acting at the local area. This means stimulating Theosophical studies in lodges and making Theosophical thinking known to the public. Recently, I have revived St John Lodge in Paris – which has a Christian background of study and reflection – and handed over the charge to one of its members. My plan of action inside the Section is to visit lodges in the provinces and settle or/and consolidate the bonds between members of the country, apart from organizing programs and conducting a monthly course at HQ in Paris. Really, I cannot answer exhaustively this question.

3.    How did you first learn about Theosophy or come in contact with the Society?

Difficult to say in a specific way. I think my family background, complemented with some study and research, has facilitated my encounter with Theosophical doctrine. Indeed, Mahayana Buddhist philosophy based on the concept of emptiness can be considered as one main pillar of Theosophy. Southeast Asia had basically been influenced by Taoism before the import of Buddhist philosophy. Taoism acquainted the mind with the concept of the inconceivable nature of the Supreme. I benefited from Taoist-Buddhist thinking before reading Krishnamurti’s writings during my first years of university time. Amongst these, The Flight of the Eagle particularly impressed my mind because it gave it what I may call “a taste of infinity.” All these have in one way or another influenced my approach towards something wider than any conventional religion.Contact with the Society came in due time with the encounter of the small book At the Feet of the Master, which is a shortened chapter of Viveka-chudamani, the Crest-Jewel of Discrimination. Perhaps it would be too long here to come to the whole story.

4.    What does Theosophy mean to you?

To live a right life, inwardly beautiful, while trying to share with the maximum of human beings what one has understood and applied to oneself: ethically, intellectually, and also beyond the realm of the visible; then to leave one’s action behind as nothing in order to go further in the depth of consciousness. To make a résumé, I would say (NB: here is a request to those who want to quote: when you quote, tell from where and quote this whole paragraph in red and not chop it into segments) that there are three types of LSD: one is a toxic chemical substance with hallucinogen effect, the two others are all Theosophical.  The first Theosophical LSD is composed of “to look, to see, and to drop”; it prepares genuine students of Theosophy to learn awareness in looking, integrity in seeing, and letting go in dropping. The second Theosophical LSD is made of “to love, to serve, and to die”; this would train the workers to learn to forget oneself, to do service, and to lead the personal ego to complete disappearance.

5.    What is your favourite Theosophical book and why?

I don’t have any. Any writing that brings understanding, inspiration toward insight, and “not chewing over” is good and useful.

6.    What in your opinion is the biggest challenge the TS Adyar (as an organization) is facing at the moment?

Challenge is the defining factor of life. In fact, life itself is a challenge. Every individual has to face diverse challenges: illness of several types related with different ages, circumstances, events, etc. The Society is a collective body which also has to face different challenges. From the founders up till now, every epoch of its existence has its own challenges.  In HPB’s time, the challenge was the Coulombs and the Hodson Report. At the time of the first President, Colonel Olcott, the challenge was the schism of the then American Section breaking away with William Quan Judge’s followers. During Annie Besant’s presidency, her proclamation of Jiddu Krishnamurti as the Messiah was a big blow to many members. George Arundale seemed to testify for the breaking off with Krishnamurti. The fourth President, Jinarajadasa, was the only one who wisely handed over the presidential charge to Sri Ram, knowing that he would not survive a second term.  Under N. Sri Ram’s presidency things went quite smoothly; was it not because he acted wisely with detachment? John Coats didn’t live long enough to have his challenge. A challenge is always an unexpected situation – provoked by unexpected events – that demands an exceptional attention and an utterly creative mind. In any challenging situation, members were expected and supposed to act according to their understanding and not according to their interests or expecting interests. This idea is neither fully idealistic nor merely wishful. It is Theosophical and ethical. Acting according to one’s understanding is acting with integrity, even though this understanding might be wrong or insufficient. Acting according to one’s interests or expected interests is acting like politicians. The challenge of all times lies in this inner attitude. This is also the challenge of the Society today.

7.    Is there anything you would wish for the future of the Theosophical movement?

I am convinced that the future of the Society does not lie in the number of the members. So I do not wish it to be enormous; though the current size is far from being satisfactory. Its future lies on the true deep sense of responsibility of each of its members to study Theosophical teachings, to understand them, and necessarily to realize them in one’s life. The members can study and learn how to present the teachings to the public; this goes without saying because, however ignorant one may be, one can still teach someone who knows less. Similarly, however knowledgeable one may be, one can learn from those who are more knowledgeable and above all wiser. Everyone can learn to be humble, sensitive, and intelligent. But your question concerns the Theosophical movement and not specifically the Society. I have been serving the TS Adyar and do not know much about the other Societies. Yet, taking the word “movement” as the whole stream of Theosophical thinking inside the evolution of human consciousness, I think that the movement would survive if those who are in the lead would favour the harmonious balance of the eclectic aspect and the zetetic* aspect. Indeed, mere intellectual knowledge is not enough however extensive it may be; intellectual knowledge – in order to earn its value – ought to be confirmed by a profound understanding, a deep inquiry, and a genuine experience in the depth of consciousness. Therefore, if the eclectic is overwhelming, the Theosophical movement would become another discursive intellectual current in the history of our civilization, and if only the zetetic is favored, the movement would turn out to be another kind of contemplative order.  Theosophy must be the “corner stone for all future religions.” Therefore, the Theosophical movement, and particularly the TS, has the duty (dharma) of hosting and nurturing Theosophy so that the future religions could properly emerge from its holistic philosophy in its width and depth. Thus, the balance of eclectic and zetetic is essential and vital for the survival of the whole movement. What applies to the whole movement naturally applies equally to the Society. So I wish and hope that all the leaders would endeavour to realize this balance for the movement and the Society.

[*Zetetic as an adjective means "inquiring, investigating" and "proceeding by inquiry or investigation," or, as a noun, "inquirer." It is used in Mahatma Letter 65 (earlier, 11), where it contrasts with “Eclectic,” referring to the Simla Eclectic Theosophical Society.]



Myrra Lee

1.     What’s your name, where are you from and how long have you been a member of the TS?

My name is Myrra Lee and I have been a member of ULT since I was a child.

2.     Are you active in your Lodge/Section and if so, what do you do?


I am active in my San Diego Lodge where I give talks and conduct classes and help determine what our studies and program should be.

3.     How did you first learn about Theosophy or come in contact with the Society?


My mother was a Theosophist.  She went to the New York ULT.

4.     What does Theosophy mean to you?


Not only does Theosophy give us a basis for action and aspiration, but it gives us an understanding of the world which is not found anywhere else. It has guided me all my life. I was actually able to introduce the concepts to my public school classes without problems from the administration. Try teaching history without the concept of cycles. Try understanding one’s own life without the concepts of karma and reincarnation. Try coming to an understanding of what one’s goals in life should be without the concept of Masters of Wisdom and duty to humanity.  None of this is really possible without the basic teachings of Theosophy.

5.    What is your favourite Theosophical book and why?


My favourite book is The Voice of the Silence. After many years of studying it I finally realized that it was the blue print of what our journey is and a warning of all the pitfalls that await us on this journey. It continually points us toward the ultimate choice wow we need to prepare to make the correct one.                                                               

6.    What in your opinion is the biggest challenge the TS Adyar (as an organization) is facing at the moment?


I feel the biggest challenge ALL Theosophical organizations face is making Theosophy available to the masses who are continually expressing readiness for it. The other challenge is how we can come together and demonstrate how we can truly express what the first object of the Theosophical Society is. As I stated last August in Julian, during the meeting of the ITC, if we expect a messenger to come to us in 2075, which is the end of the seven hundred years cycle, we better overcome antipathy toward one another which has been expressed for years.

7.     Is there anything you would wish for the future of the Theosophical Movement?

I believe I stated this in my answer to question six. What I wish for the future of the Theosophical Movement is that there will be a united group of students ready to acknowledge the teacher and be ready to work with her. I believe that this is what we envisioned almost seven hundred years ago. The groundwork should be and is being laid now by all our efforts.




John Algeo

1.    What’s your name, where are you from and how long have you been a member of the TS?

John Algeo, from the U.S.A. I joined the T.S. at the age of 17 in 1947.

2.    Are you active in your Lodge/Section and if so, what do you do?

I was President of the Florida Lodge (Miami) shortly after joining. In later years, I was president of the Atlanta, Georgia, Lodge and chairman of the board for the Stil-Light Theosophical Center in North Carolina. In the American Section, I served on the National Board of Directors (1984–7), as First Vice President (1987–93), and as National President (1993–2002). I was international Vice President 2002–8.

3.    How did you first learn about Theosophy or come in contact with the Society?

I read a pamphlet about Theosophy as a “dangerous heresy” in the library of a Jesuit church in Miami; then I saw a T.S. meeting announced in the Miami Herald newspaper, attended, and joined a few weeks later. So I say that the Jesuits converted me to Theosophy.

4.    What does Theosophy mean to you?

Theosophy offers the most explanatory view of the cosmos and human life I have ever found, and it provides the best guide for successful living out of all systems of thought I’ve encountered.

5.    What is your favourite Theosophical book and why?

The Secret Doctrine because it is the fullest exposition of the cosmos and humanity.

6.    What in your opinion is the biggest challenge the TS Adyar (as an organization) is facing at the moment?

The Adyar society needs to keep abreast (internationally) with current developments in communication (as Theosophy Forward is doing!) and with the presentation of the Ancient Wisdom for modern times. It also needs to critically appraise its form of organizational government and make whatever adaptations that appraisal leads to.

7.    Is there anything you would wish for the future of the Theosophical Movement?

The movement as a whole needs to work more assiduously at fulfilling the Mahachohan’s vision of its future and its contribution to the welfare of the planet and all humanity.



Arend Heijbroek

1.    What’s your name, where are you from and how long have you been a member of the TS?

My name is Arend Heijbroek. I live in the Netherlands and am a member of the TS since 1973.

2.    Are you active in your Lodge/Section and if so, what do you do?

I have always been active in the organisational side of the TS in the Netherlands. Today I serve the TS as chairman of International Theosophical Centre in Naarden. More information on the past and future of the ITC can be found at Theosophy Forward, click here ... http://www.theosophyforward.net/special.html

3.    How did you first learn about Theosophy or come in contact with the Society?

I came in contact with it through a class mate in 1969. There was the Young Theosophists (YT) camp in Denmark, where I met John Coats for the first time, who made a big impression on me. The following year there was an YT camp in Gstaadt, Switzerland, close to the tent where Krishnamurti gave his lectures. He changed my life. Next there was a Secret Doctrine study group of the young Theosophists in the Netherlands and I got involved in the work.

4.    What does Theosophy mean to you?

Theosophy is my spiritual home.

5.    What is your favourite Theosophical book and why?

The Secret Doctrine. The breadth and depth of its concepts will always provoke my mind and avoid dogmatic or simple solutions to the questions of life.

6.    What in your opinion is the biggest challenge the TS Adyar (as an organization) is facing at the moment?

Any real spiritual path has to do with quiet enquiry for truth. This current hectic life with its modern communication seems to stimulate stirring emotions and create distrust. This is also visible within the TS. Even with the best intent, when we are protecting ideas or structures, we should be very careful not to allow ourselves to get carried away.

7.    Is there anything you would wish for the future of the Theosophical Movement?

I wish that the TS could regain its original task to serve mankind, bringing concepts of ancient wisdom to a broad public. This means that our focus should be external rather than internal.



John Drais

1. What’s your name, where are you from and how long have you been a member of the TS?

John H. Drais. I am a Californian and joined the TS in 1973. I am not currently a member of any of the Theosophical Societies, but am active in Theosophical work through The Paracelsiam Order, a Theosophical monastic order.

2. Are you active in your Lodge/Section and if so, what do you do?

I am Abbot of The Paracelsiam Order and a monk of Madre Grande Monastery. I teach all levels of Theosophy, loving-kindness and mindfulness meditation, Reiki, and Kabbalah. I also help others to adjust to communal life and work to set up Theosophical monasteries in the United States and other countries. My life revolves around making Theosophy practical so that it becomes a living power in my life and the life of those I come in contact with.

3. How did you first learn about Theosophy or come in contact with the Society?

I first heard of HPB in a small paperback primer of magic. It mentioned her as the "priestess of the occult". Naturally I looked her up and found Isis Unveiled in the San Diego library. Then I started attending the local Adyar lodge, joined the society, opened a Quest Bookshop and incorporated the Theosophical Society in San Diego. From the membership of this lodge The Paracelsiam Order was formed and a large piece of property was purchased in the hills east of San Diego to set up a Theosophical community. We moved onto the property in December 1975 and continue to pursue our Theosophical goals there today.

4. What does Theosophy mean to you?

Theosophy is the universal key to understanding world religions and religious philosophy. Through Theosophy respect and tolerance for all religious, cultural expressions are gained. Freedom from dogma, creeds, and religious authority allows all individuals to be responsible for their own spiritual growth. The doctrines of the modern theosophical movement give a clear expression of the path to adeptship and the reason to pursue it.

5. What is your favourite Theosophical book and why?

The Voice of the Silence. This little book speaks to the heart and soul and contains the essence of Raja Yoga. While there are many great books in the theosophical world that develop the Theosophical philosophy, they are mostly applied to the Eye Doctrine. This includes The Secret Doctrine, HPBs magnum opus, and as great as it is it still does not develop heart light and "only that can guide".

6. What in your opinion is the biggest challenge the TS Adyar (as an organization) is facing at the moment?

The challenge, I think, for Adyar, as for all the Theosophical organizations, is to formulate a code of life that is meaningful for all, that instills the principles of brotherhood and compassion into our daily lives, and that provides a reasonable alternative to the philosophy materialism as well as to the religion of humanistic materialism.

7. Is there anything you would wish for the future of the Theosophical Movement?

One of the reasons for establishing the Theosophical Society was to make religion more Theosophical. That is the purpose of The Paracelsiam Order, also. Rather than publishing houses espousing their particular versions of Theosophy, I would like to see all Theosophical Societies doing more practical Theosophical work to alleviate the burden of the great orphan humanity. The work of Vicente Hao Chin in the Philippines is a great example of such work. A broader membership should be sought by making the teachings practical and meaningful without distortions or simplifications and still adhering to the original program.


Ligia Beatriz Montiel Longhi

1.    What’s your name, where are you from and how long have you been a member of the TS?

My name is Ligia Beatriz Montiel Longhi. I am from Costa Rica, Central America and I have been a member since the 19th of January 1976.

2.    Are you active in your Lodge/Section and if so, what do you do?

I’m the president of my Lodge.  I was recently elected president of the Inter-American Theosophical Federation. I teach basic courses, give public lectures and also courses for members only. I chair the healing service of the Theosophical Order of Service and I am in charge of the group of candidates of the EET.

3.    How did you first learn about Theosophy or come in contact with the Society?

I come from a Theosophical family. My maternal grandfather was a Theosophist and he educated his family in Theosophy. I also had the support of my aunt and my mother. My grandfather was an Italian immigrant whose parents met Theosophy in their country of origin. I can say I was born and grew up among Theosophists and I accepted those ideas as very logical and convincing.

4.    What does Theosophy mean to you?

It is a way of life, in my case its teachings have been present and implemented at every step and decision that I made in my work, my relationships with my fellow humans and the other kingdoms of nature. It has given me peace and a motivation to live and serve.

5.     What is your favourite Theosophical book and why?

My favorite books are: The Voice of the Silence and The Secret Doctrine. These two books are translated from the original English language in which they were written. The Voice of the Silence is a perfect guide for spiritual development and leads to a true commitment to yourself and the Masters. The Secret Doctrine because it has answered all my questions in the different fields of human knowledge both seen and hidden.

6.    What in your opinion is the biggest challenge the TS Adyar (as an organization) is facing at the moment?

To keep all its associated Lodges united in criteria and action, and to generate interest in Theosophical knowledge among young people while maintaining a clear idea of selfless service.

7.    Is there anything you would wish for the future of the Theosophical Movement?

My desire is that the Theosophical Society will continue doing its work even if it’s only with a few members, always faithful to the search for truth and spiritual progress of humanity

Website Inter-American Theosophical Federation, click here


Truth Collins

1.    What’s your name, where are you from and how long have you been a member of the TS?

My name is Truth Collins, from Ventura, CA.  Before answering the third part of the question I admit that I find some difficulty in responding to the wording. I find myself wondering which is the more ideal wording, “the TS” or “a TS” in regards to the question. While “a TS” allows for people to volunteer that they’ve been members of multiple “TS” organizations the expression “the TS” is more universally definitive, less implying that anything will do. Lacking context, I’d take it that the “TS” universally stands for all Theosophical societies unless it is specifically stated otherwise. As such, the “TS” has become colloquial language for one branch of the Theosophical movement, this being the society which has its American headquarters in Wheaton, Il and its international headquarters in Adyar, India, which I’ve been a member of for about fifteen years. None the less, as is not uncommon among Theosophists I’ve met, I’ve always had an inclusive attitude about what it means to be a Theosophist. Likewise, on that note, I find myself being a bit too much of a literalist to exclude like minded/spirited people from a spiritually oriented society because of not being officially affiliated. Both in conversation and in articles I’ve read the distinction has repeatedly been made that there are Theosophists at heart, whose goal is to learn and share divine wisdom - the meaning of Theosophy, who are either unaware of or have drawn false conclusions about what Theosophy is or has been made out to be. 

2.    Are you active in your Lodge/Section and if so, what do you do?

Of late, I have not been very active in a formal lodge or group though I have attended Theosophical gatherings and conferences, attended lectures, and participated in Internet based social networking.  Over the years I’ve contributed to online discussion groups, participated in an effort to create a virtual Theosophy lodge a few years ago for online presentations and discussions, and was involved in the seven year lecture series presented by Barrett Culmback, an old family friend.

3.    How did you first learn about Theosophy or come in contact with the Society?

My mother introduced me to Theosophy.  We had “Hermes” magazines published by Raghavan Iyer as well as other Theosophically influenced writings around our home when I was growing up. When I was five years old she first started taking me to philosophy classes taught by Barrett Culmback who was involved in the ULT in Santa Barbara. She also took me to attend lectures by Krishnamurti and exposed her children to a wide range of ideas. For example, I remember when we attended a rain dance and got stuck in a flash flood. As a symbol, that flash flood is a good example of how I feel about the reality of Theosophical ideas, that they are undoubtedly meaningful.

4.    What does Theosophy mean to you?

In order to explain how I feel about what Theosophy is I’m first going to engage in some amateur etymology by way of what I think of when I consider the word. Theo- is similar to words and root meanings which mean to shine, the sky, and day. As such, the word divine, which theo-, according to my understanding, shares the root “div” with means to shine. As such I am reminded of the word “kindle” in association with the idea that wisdom which is what -sophia means, Sophia being the Greek goddess of Wisdom, that the light of wisdom has to be kindled in order to continue to shine. As such, I interpret the word Theosophy to have the idea of responsibility implied in it, that Theosophy involves teaching as well as learning.

5.    What is your favourite Theosophical book and why?

The Jewel in the Lotus by Ragavhan Iyer is my favorite because it is designed to be read daily. We’ve had a copy of it in our household when I was growing up. I’ve always enjoyed looking at the illustrations and have often felt a sense of well being when reading from it. It contains great quotes and excerpts including poetry, prose and prayers.  It is a wonderful book for daily contemplatiobr /n and meditation.

6.    What in your opinion is the biggest challenge the TS br /Adyar (as an organization) is facing at the moment?

The biggest challenge is adaptation. While many things have changed, something I have always found appealing about Theosophy is the association between Theosophy and occultism, the idea that through contemplation and meditation one may reach essentially the same conclusions as someone else who's studied the same subject. In other words, truth takes many forms but people who’ve realized the same truth may be able to recognize it when communicating with each other. What this has to do with current challenges of the T.S. Adyar, as with every other Theosophical group, is that in order for the Theosophical Society to move forward people must continue to be able to relate to the standards that are implemented by the society.

To be more specific, the following are a few observations. Among the issues increasingly facing present humanity in the near future is the acceptance of human rights without discrimination. While the first object of the Theosophical Society, in its nucleus state, has done much to promote the idea of human rights in regards to “race, creed, sex, and color” it also needs to be extended to include those who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender. So, I suggest that the first object of the various Theosophical groups language be extended to include the LGBT community, our fellow human beings. In regards to the restriction on the eating of meat on Theosophical Society grounds it has to go. It has nothing to do with occultism. As a lifelong vegetarian I feel confident in saying that diet doesn’t make anyone more spiritual than anyone else. And for that matter, neither does gender identification nor gender preference make anyone any better than anyone else. Issues such as these which have to do with Universal Brotherhood and Sisterhood will continue to be controversial issues around the world. As the population increases it will be increasingly important that people continue treat each other with compassion, to feed and provide for each other.

In regards to the changing world, computers, along with what has been referred to as “the internet of things” is dramatically changing the way in which the people of the more developed nations are interacting with the world and each other. Whereas inner development has held precedence among much of the world’s population in the form of religion, people today are increasingly becoming preoccupied with augmenting their senses by way of various gadgets and other electronic devices. Cell phones, texting, instantly sharing photographs with (embedded gps coordinates), and countless task specific apps are just the beginning. Content on demand is changing the way that people learn about the world. Rather than reading a newspaper or watching a television show which delivers content on schedule people are accessing crowdsourced streams of information at their leisure. What I am trying to get at by mentioning the above is that technology is accompanying a paradigm shift in perspective. Naturally, the Theosophical Society will have to adapt so that future Theosophists will continue be able to relate to each other as well as what the Theosophical Society is about.

7.    Is there anything you would wish for the future of the Theosophical Movement?

The unification and greater cooperation of the Theosophical societies, the TS Adyar, the Point Loma Tradition, the ULT, etc. I consider all Theosophical societies as instruments of the Theosophical Movement.

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